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W&D Weekly
September 24, 2014
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The Latest
Fortune Brands Completes Sale of Simonton Windows

Fortune Brands Home & Security, Inc. completed the sale of Simonton Windows to Ply Gem Holdings, Inc., for approximately $130 million. Read more...

 
PGT Completes Acquisition of CGI Windows & Doors

PGT Inc. has completed the acquisition of CGI Windows & Doors Holdings Inc. The transaction is valued at approximately $111 million. Read more...

 
A Closer Look at Rough Openings

"Rough opening” is a regular part of our terminology. Yet, the requirements and variations are not often fully understood. This lack of comprehensive knowledge can lead to both improperly installed windows and ordering errors. Read more…

 

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More News
Bob Pool, Founder and Chairman of Thermal Windows, Passes Away
Fenzi Group President Dino Fenzi Passes Away
Pella’s Joseph Hayden Named NFRC’s Dariush Arasteh Member of the Year
North Carolina Rejects Temporary Rule Discouraging Use of Low-E Windows
AAMA Fall Conference Speaker Addresses Impact of California Regulations on the U.S.
The Talk

By Jim Snyder
As I explain in my most recent From the Field column, in new construction, a “rough opening” is specified via the called-out window size and then framed accordingly. For replacement, however, a rough opening that already exists is used to suggest a replacement product frame size. However, that’s not the only dimensional reference.

When measuring for full-frame replacement, we usually can’t see the rough opening. Through experience I’ve learned to deduce the rough opening dimensions without actually exposing it in most cases. Additionally, the rough opening is not my only dimensional reference for ordering. Depending on the application, I will likely also measure the exterior cladding opening and even the interior casing-to-casing dimensions and settle on a replacement window frame that I feel will best fit all, or at least most, of these parameters.

If I can’t fit all parameters with the replacement product, I usually prioritize each. For instance, if the exterior cladding is brick (on a wood frame structure), that is my first priority dimension. I will then consider the rough opening and the interior casing or returns as secondary, since both of those can be more easily modified than the brick. I also have to consider if the existing and replacement window has exterior casing or trim accessories. This prioritizing can change if the cladding is more forgiving, such as wood siding.

Ultimately, I’m considering what will result in the best appearance and performance with reasonable installation effort.

In this week’s poll, I ask for your full-frame measuring technique. Is it similar to mine? Or do you have a different approach? Take the poll, post a comment or send me a note at Jim@windowjim.com.
When measuring for full-frame replacement, I consider:
Only one parameter and then order.
Two of these parameters and then order.
All three of these parameters and then order.
Jim, you’re doing it the hard way. I have a completely different technique.
 
 

 

Do you use industry jargon in marketing pieces and sales pitches?
About half the respondents to last week's poll do use industry jargon, but are careful to explain what they mean. See the full survey results...

 
The Outside View
Dealers' Rosy Forecasts Top Customers' Outlooks
From ProSales Magazine
HCN Scoreboard Series: Distribution Nation
From Home Channel News

 
 
Recent Introductions

Renolit Exofol FX Line from American Renolit

 
 
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